Programs
 

Michael Gordon's new work to premiere in March 2020 is a 60-minute work for 24 voices and solo cello featuring Maya Beiser.

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This program combines David Lang’s enchanting Pulitzer Prize-winning work based on a Hans Christian Andersen short story with short pieces by Andriessen, Jackson, Ešenvalds, Lang, and Hearne from our signature book of commissions, Jeff Quartets.

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Ted Hearne's probing exploration of the Supreme Court's Citizen's United decision for choir, electric guitars, and drums/percussion. Texts are lifted from Jena Osman's "Corporate Relations," a collection of poems that follows the historical trajectory of corporate personhood in the United States. The five movement combine language taken from landmark Supreme Court cases with words from ventriloquism textbooks and is scored for 24 voices, 2 guitars, and percussion. Sound from the Bench shares a program with three other recent pieces by Hearne that, in the words of The Crossing's conductor, Donald Nally, are “fundamentally about asking questions—questions about the world we live in, about art, and about language and music.”

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Anonymous Man is a concert-length work from Bang on a Can composer Michael Gordon, based on conversations he has had over the past few years with homeless men who live on his street in New York City. These conversations are serious, funny, mysterious, poetic, and mundane, and they are with men who have become invisible to the world around them. Anonymous Man is Gordon's attempt to hear them.

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John Luther Adams's concert-length work lauded by the New York Times as a "...hypnotic and ethereally beautiful invocation of wind, sky, and birdsong." 

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Julia Wolfe's oratorio for 32 women voices and orchestra was commissioned by The New York Philharmonic and premieres in January 2019 with Jaap van Zweden conducting. The immersive and visual work explores the devastating Triangle Shirtwaist Factory Fire of 1911 in New York that killed 146 young immigrant workers.

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Musical responses to each of the seven cantatas from Buxtehude's Membra Jesu Nostri were commissioned from Anna Thorvaldsdottir, Caroline Shaw, Santa Ratniece, Lewis Spratlan, David T. Little, Hans Thomalla, Pelle Gudmudsen-Holmgreen.

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From Eriks Ešenvalds' expansive Northern Lights and Edwin Fissinger's well-beloved Lux Aeterna to Ko Matsushita's intensely rhythmic O Lux beata Trinitas, this program is an aural exploration of light and its effects on us, especially in the darkest and coldest hours of winter.

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A commissioned work of Estonian legend Toivo Tulev—based on this iconic poem of Walt Whitman—is the centerpiece of this concert, alongside a collection of works full of rich textures and the soaring sounds of sixteen solo voices. Featuring Pelle Gudmundsen-Holmgreen’s Three Stages – with its exhilarating mix of thought, exploration of contemporary cultural clashes, and whimsy – and music of Ted Hearne.

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Are we called today to pacifism or activism? What do we protect, the integrity of capitalism or the health of the community? These questions lie at the root of poems by Thomas Merton and Denise Levertov. Set by Gregory Spears in a new 30-minute work for strings and choir, they also ask us to consider the relationship between technological innovation and its dangers that often lead to haunting sociological change. Philadelphia composer James Primosch sets an excerpt from Marilynne Robinson’s Housekeeping, an exploration of the balancing effect of desire and longing on our lives. The program includes two additional works written for The Crossing, Toivo Tulev’s A child said, what is the grass? and Joel Puckett’s dizzying, entrancing I enter the earth.

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A legacy project honoring the vision of The Crossing’s co-founder, Jeff Dinsmore, this evening of fifteen short works commissioned by The Crossing in 2016 brings together some of the world's most influential and imaginative composers into a coherent, meaningful journey.

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David Lang writes: “Hiding in every national anthem is the recognition that we are insecure about our freedoms, that freedom is fragile, and delicate, and easy to lose. Maybe an anthem is a memory informing a kind of prayer, a heartfelt plea:"There was a time when we were forced to live in chains. Please don’t make us live in chains again."

The Crossing’s long association with Lang’s choral writing - through commissions, collaborations and recordings – is heard in a perfect marriage of composer, aesthetic, and ensemble.

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